Mr. Greg's Reptile Roadshow

Mr. Greg's Reptile Roadshow Specializing in Natural History - Science education.

Collection of Reptile and Amphibian FigurinesGreg Greer:  678-764-3636I have a nice collection of reptile and amphibian ...
03/02/2018

Collection of Reptile and Amphibian Figurines
Greg Greer: 678-764-3636

I have a nice collection of reptile and amphibian figurines for sale.
There is a big assortment of frogs, turtles, snakes, lizards and crocodiles.
A variety of Glass, pottery, stone, metal and wooden figurines.
Sizes also vary with many being small figurines while others are quite large, such as the road-runner and rattlesnake.

Collection consists of:
13 snakes
10 frogs
35 turtles and tortoises
3 lizards
3 alligators
=======
64 total number of pieces

A few of these figurines were purchased in other counties and thus would not be available in the U.S.
The green metal snake is from the Hopi Native American tribe in the 4 corners area of Western U.S.
98 percent of the pieces are absolutely perfect. Only a couple have minimal chipping.

Please note! These are not toys but they are collectables to be displayed and not played with.

Please let me know if you have any questions;
Asking: $150

Averages only $2.35 each.

On Saturday, Feb. 10th, I went to Sweetwater Wetlands, near Gainesville, Florida to search for a rare North American vis...
02/12/2018

On Saturday, Feb. 10th, I went to Sweetwater Wetlands, near Gainesville, Florida to search for a rare North American visitor....a Ruff. Actually, what I was looking for was a Reeve as it was a female. Males are know as Ruff's. The Ruff is a Eurasian sandpiper that typically winters in Africa. There are a few that find their way into North America each Fall and Winter. This was my second trip to search for the Reeve, my first trip was not successful. On Saturday, I arrived at 8 am and the wetlands were extremely foggy but it made for wonderful activity of birds and reptiles. A very large male alligator bellowed for about 30 minutes and they are always wonderful to hear and watch their courtship display. Limpkin and black-bellied whistling ducks were extremely vocal providing more of a sound similar to the Amazon than a North American chorus. It took me 3 hours to find the elusive sandpiper, but the hiking and scoping thousands of birds was rewarded in great observations of the sandpiper. Attached is a very poor photo of the Reeve. Nothing special to most people but to a birder....it was awesome. I have also included some additional images of the morning birding.

Red-Shouldered hawk.
02/12/2018

Red-Shouldered hawk.

Photos taken on trip to Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Alexandria Va., Va. Beach, Va., Hatteras NC, Francis Marion Nationa...
12/14/2017

Photos taken on trip to Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Alexandria Va., Va. Beach, Va., Hatteras NC, Francis Marion National Forest.

's cover photo
12/14/2017

's cover photo

's cover photo
12/01/2017

's cover photo

What do these 3 different forms of rattlesnakes have in common?  Yes, they are all rattlesnakes!  Yes, they are all youn...
05/05/2017

What do these 3 different forms of rattlesnakes have in common? Yes, they are all rattlesnakes! Yes, they are all young of this past fall birthing season! Yes, they are all Eastern North American species! Yes, they are all venomous at birth! However, the most important thing about these little gems has to do with their importance in saving the lives of many rattlesnakes each year. How is this possible? These snakes are now education snakes used by Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Non-game Section, for use at the snake festivals at Claxton and Whigum, Georgia. These festivals in past years were rattlesnake round-ups where hundreds of large rattlesnakes were collected annually, brought into the round-ups, where they were put on display, then killed and skinned as a commodity. Today, thanks to the conservation efforts of Ga. DNR, the Orianne Society and others, the round-ups have become an education venue where visitors can learn about snakes, especially the native venomous species and their importance in the ecology of the sandhill communities. I was able to secure over 20 captive born baby rattlesnakes this year for Georgia DNR and I kept the snakes to get them established in captivity. The young snakes did extremely well, fed voraciously and grew substantially over the few months that I housed the snakes in my facility. They quickly went from fuzzy mice to small mice and the Eastern Diamond-backs were taking adult mice within their first 4 months of life. The snakes will be good long term captives and provide wonderful education to many Georgians and out of states visitors in the future. I absolutely love baby reptiles and new-born rattlesnakes are gorgeous little creatures exhibiting wonderful adaptations that are a marvel of years of evolution.

Retirement:  July 13, 2017 from Mr. Greg’s Reptile Roadshow & Greg Greer Enterprises, Inc.Well, the time has finally c...
02/10/2017

Retirement: July 13, 2017 from Mr. Greg’s Reptile Roadshow & Greg Greer Enterprises, Inc.

Well, the time has finally come for me to retire as of July 13th, of this year.
It has been an extremely rewarding 7 years providing educational programs with live reptiles and over those years, my programs have reached over 100,000 people. As many of you are aware, providing the programs was only about 25% of the actual work and the other 75% was the up-keep of a large and diverse collection of animals. Having a large collection does not allow for many days off as there are animals that require daily feeding and of course cleaning cages, checking heat during winter and air conditioning during summer was a constant demand of time and during extremely cold nights, getting up a few times during the night to insure heaters were functioning, did not allow for much sleep during those times.

It has been extremely fun promoting reptile stewardship and working with numerous teachers, parents and colleagues over the past 7 years. I will miss seeing the many of you that have become friends over the years and I hope that you call me from time to time, especially if you have little treasures to identify as I am always happy to provide information on the creepy crawlies that show up, sometimes very unexpectedly, in homes, yards and on hikes.

Last of all, I want to mention that my numerous collections of bio-facts will be available. As many of you know, I have a large collection of skulls (about 350 skulls), tanned skins, fossils, rocks & minerals, seashells and seashore treasures, snake-bite kit and anti-venin kit collection, carved animal’s collection from all around the globe as well as some extremely unique items from around the world. All of these collections are available and unfortunately, I do have to sell them as I have an incredible amount of time and financial investment in acquiring these collections. I do have some private collectors that have asked to purchase some of the collections but I have not committed to them as I would prefer for the items to go to an educational facility where the collections can continue to be of educational value. Let me know if any of you have an interest in the collections.

My schedule, between now and July 13th, is extremely well booked with over 100 bookings. It looks like this year will not only be my last year but it will also be my most busy year. Many thanks to all of you for confiding in me to provide educational programs and I hope that you have enjoyed the programs as much as I have in presenting them.

Many, many thanks,
Greg

Jan. 31, 2017:  Today, Donna and I birded along the North Shore of Lake Superior north of Duluth, Mn.  It turned out to ...
02/01/2017

Jan. 31, 2017: Today, Donna and I birded along the North Shore of Lake Superior north of Duluth, Mn. It turned out to be an incredible day with some very nice species of "not commonly observed" birds.
Again today we observed an adult Northern Shrike which is always a wonderful bird to find. In a big raft of about 250 Common Goldeneye (ducks) I found an adult female Barrow's Goldeneye, identified by its yellow bill. A little later on, in a small group of herring gulls, I found an adult Thayer's gull. Then, the icing on the cake today was when Donna yelled.....Owl! Well, very surprisingly due to our location and the habitat was a big Great Grey Owl. I say habitat as these big owls seem to reside in Black Spruce and Tamarack habitats. This owl was in cedar, just a few black spruce and paper birch. Not a place where anyone would expect a great gray owl. Anyway, the owl perched on a sign right on the shoulder of the road. Donna was driving and she turned the car around and we slowly proceeded towards the bird. I was shooting images out the passenger window as we edged closer and closer. At about 70 feet away, we stopped and Donna turned off the engine to prevent unnecessary shake of the camera. Attached are three photos from today's observation of another amazing Great Gray Owl.

Just a few of the species observed in the Sac-Zim Bog area of Mn. on Jan. 30l, 2017
01/31/2017

Just a few of the species observed in the Sac-Zim Bog area of Mn. on Jan. 30l, 2017

Great Gray Owl
01/31/2017

Great Gray Owl

These are not flowers on the trees.....it is ice shining in the sunlight.
01/07/2017

These are not flowers on the trees.....it is ice shining in the sunlight.

01/07/2017

Well, it was a very cold and icy night in Marietta. Always a concern with a large collection of reptiles that require staying warm. The temperature this morning dipped into the high teens and the rain of yesterday afternoon, turned to ice and then it sleeted on top of that. This morning, even with a gorgeous sun and blue sky, the temperature in my yard at 11 am is only 22 degrees. I keep checking my reptile building and greenhouse to insure that heaters are working properly. I have back up kerosene heaters filled and ready to go in the event of a power outage..... which is happening in some areas due to ice laden limbs falling on power lines. I have put out lots of bird feed and already have observed 17 speciesi in my backyard. This is a very rare event for this far south and one that always puts a person with reptiles on alert. Attached are a couple of photos from 11 am in Marietta.

I have recently added a very interesting little snake to my collection.  It is an aberrant Eastern hognose snake.  The s...
12/13/2016

I have recently added a very interesting little snake to my collection. It is an aberrant Eastern hognose snake. The snake is from Bryan County, Georgia in the area of Pembroke. The baby hognose is uniquely patterned and coloration is more similar to a copperhead than a hognose snake. The tiny snake is readily feeding on small toads and I am eager to see what this snake looks like as it matures. The small bulge in the middle of the snake is a recent meal.

Another relatively new snake to my rotation of program animals is a nice, light phase (Blair phase) gray-banded kingsnak...
10/17/2016

Another relatively new snake to my rotation of program animals is a nice, light phase (Blair phase) gray-banded kingsnake. This is a very nice adult that feeds extremely well on frozen/thawed mice. This animal is from stock originally from the Comstock Juno Rd that runs North from Comstock, Texas.

A new addition to my reptile menagerie.  A baby pied ball python.  These little snakes grow fairly quickly and this litt...
10/17/2016

A new addition to my reptile menagerie. A baby pied ball python. These little snakes grow fairly quickly and this little gem will be available for programs by early summer. Due to the snakes color and pattern, I know the snake will be a hit with students and youngsters at birthday parties.

One of the most joyous things about keeping reptiles is witnessing some things that most people never have the pleasure ...
05/14/2016

One of the most joyous things about keeping reptiles is witnessing some things that most people never have the pleasure of observing......the reproductive effort of a large Python laying eggs. My big female albino Burmese Python laid eggs just over a month ago and I was able to watch her as she contracted her body in producing the last 4 eggs of her clutch. She then checked her clutch with a great deal of tongue flicking and then began to completely wrap her body around her clutch of eggs. A photo is included of the snake about 3 days after she produced her eggs.

04/06/2016

One of the things I enjoy doing is exciting youngsters to keep journals and checklists of observations. In my work with travel companies over the years, I have created checklists for family workshops in the Peruvian Amazon, Costa Rica and the Galapagos Islands. When I develop a checklist, I list mainly creatures that are very likely to observed so that youngsters are not disappointed by the number of species they do not see, as would happen with a complete checklist of species in any given area. On a recent trip to the Gulf Coast of Florida, my wife and I took 7 grandchildren for a nice 4 day nature outing. I provided checklists for each of them as well as a new journal for them to take notes....if they wanted to. Well, the checklists were a huge hit and typical of children, it became competitive as to who could spot birds, animals and DOR's (Dead creatures on the road) before anyone else. Attached is a checklist from one fo the grandchildren. Parents and educators, this is a great way to get your children and students away from electronics and into writing, observation and learning while on drives or at your destination.

My Checklist
Florida Adventure
w/Nonna & GG
Feb. 13 -16, 2016
Birds
_X_ Canada Goose
_X_ Mallard
___ Northern Shovelor
_X_ Common Loon
_X_ Double-crested Cormorant
___ Anhinga
_X_ Brown Pelican
___ American White Pelican
_X_ Great Blue Heron
_X_ Great Egret
_X_ Snowy Egret
___ Tricolored Heron
_X_ Black Vulture
_X_ Turkey Vulture
_X_ Osprey
_X_ Bald Eagle
_X_ Red-tailed Hawk
_X_ Red-shouldered Hawk
_X_ Kestrel
___ Coot
___ Wild Turkey
___ Black-bellied Plover
___ Killdeer
_X_ Willet
_X_ Sanderling
___ Greater Yellow-legs
_X_ Ring-billed Gull
_X_ Herring Gull
_X_ Forster’s Tern
_X_ Royal Tern
_X_ Mourning Dove
_X_ Eurasian White-collared Dove
(Introduced)
_X_ Rock Dove (Introduced)
_X_ Belted Kingfisher
_X_ Red-bellied Woodpecker
___ Downy Woodpecker
_X_ Eastern Phoebe
___ Blue Jay
_X_ Fish Crow
_X_ Common Crow
___ Carolina Chickadee
___ Tufted Titmouse
_X_ Eastern Bluebird
_X_ American Robin
___ Brown Thrasher
_X_ Mockingbird
_X_ Loggerhead Shrike
_X_ Starling (Introduced)
___ Pine Warbler
___ Palm Warbler
_X_ Yellow-rumped Warbler
___ Dark-eyed Junco
___ White-throated Sparrow
___ Song Sparrow
_X_ Cardinal
_X_ Red-winged Blackbird
_X_ Boat-tailed Grackle
___ House Finch
___ American Goldfinch

Bird Write-in’s:
___ Laughing Gull
___ Water Pipit
___ Greater Scaup
___ Bonaparte’s Gull
___ Cedar Waxwing
___ Bufflehead

Notes:
Learning to tell the difference in the two vultures by their wings was awesome.
The dead loon on the beach was very cool. The big dagger like bill and huge webbed feet were amazing. Grampa GG brought the loon home to give to UGA. I have never had a loon in our cooler before. Grampa GG does some strange things with animals.

DOR’s (Dead on Road)
___ Gray Squirrel
_X_ Cottontail
_X_ Opossum
_X_ Raccoon
_X_ Striped Skunk
_X_ Armadillo
_X_ White-tailed Deer

Write in’s (DOR’s)
Barred Owl
Screech Owl
Red Fox
Red-tailed Hawk
Common Loon (Dead on Beach)

BEACH COMBING DISCOVERIES:
Dead Common Loon
Cockle Shells
Sea Urchins
Coral
Sea Cucumber
Sea Fan
Sponges
Pen Shell

AQUARIUM CREATURES:
Nurse Sharks
Green Sea Turtle
Calico Crabs
Horse Shoe Crabs
Blue Crabs
Spider Crabs
Whelks
Tritons
Trigger Fish
Red Fish
Slipper Lobster
Spiny Lobster
Basket Sponge
Long-spine sea urchin

FARM / DOMESTIC ANIMALS:
_X_ Cattle
_X_ Horses
_X_ Donkey
_X_ Sheep
_X_ Goats
___ Pigs
___ Chickens

HABITAT TYPES
_X_ Agriculture (crops)
_X_ Cypress Swamp
_X_ Barrier Beach
_X_ Sand Dunes
_X_ Fresh Water Marsh
_X_ Salt Marsh
___ Mud Flat
___ Impoundment
_X_ Lake
_X_ Pine Flat Woods
_X_ Deciduous Forest

BIO-REGIONS
_X_ Gulf of Mexico
_X_ Coastal Plain
_ X_ Piedmont

REPTILES & AMPHIBIANS:
No reptiles & amphibians:
Weather was very cold and windy. Not very good conditions for observing herps!

NOTES:
Lots of habitat destruction due to new construction or clearing of land for farming.
Observed a very cool controlled burn of pine flatwoods.
We observed an adult bald eagle eating a DOR armadillo on the side of the road.
Driving home, in Central Georgia, Colt mentioned he would like to see another eagle. Donna mentioned not likely and two minutes later…..a gorgeous adult bald eagle was flying very low over a pond. Colt was ecstatic!

This checklist was printed on folded card stock similar to most pocket checklists. I could not get it to print that way on facebook.
Cheers!

I present a large number of reptile programs every year, reaching over 25,000 students annually.  A topic I like to cove...
03/21/2016

I present a large number of reptile programs every year, reaching over 25,000 students annually. A topic I like to cover is "mimicry" and I use a variety of tri-colored king snakes for that purpose. People often like to state the rhyme "red and black, friend of jack. Red and yellow kill a fellow. I usually tell participants to simply leave red patterned snakes alone as in the excitement of finding a snake in close quarters, confusing the rhyme could be dangerous. Always best to just leave the snakes alone as they certainly are not going to hurt anyone if they are not touched. Below are the two non-venomous specie: scarlet snake and scarlet King snake as well as 2 images of the venomous coral snake.

I recently visited New York City and no trip to NY is worthwhile without a visit to the American Museum of Natural Histo...
03/21/2016

I recently visited New York City and no trip to NY is worthwhile without a visit to the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). The taxidermy is absolutely exquisite with life size mounts including: a herd of Savannah Elephants, family group of Gorilla, and extinct species like Labrador duck, passenger pigeon and Carolina Parakeet. Equally impressive are the mounts of reptiles. Reptiles are considerably more difficult to mount as they do not have fur or feathers to cover sutures and they require a complete paint job. The Komodo Monitors, leatherback sea turtles and King cobra are nothing less than spectacular.

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Marietta, GA
30067

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